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the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern israel and for the grave loss of life in gaza. i think all of us, across the european union, including also ame
around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater t
a hero. i would like your opinion about what is going on right now with israel and palestine. to gaza. i think they are acting upon hamas in order to put their blame -- against iran and see what your opinions would be. guest: that has been a mess for a long time and i believe we should be noninterventionists. we should not pick sides. i think it would be best for israel and best for that whole region, so i don't believe in getting involved. it is a real mess. it's been created by too much and too many outsiders interfering. but this gaza thing, i mean, attacking and bombing gaza, that doesn't make a whole lot of sense. what threat are the palestinians? to israel or anybody else? they are living in total poverty. they have an employment rate probably about 50%. sure, there are going to be militants. you have to understand why they're militants. you know, what is the reasons? they have been held more or less in bondage for decades now. it's a real mess. i think we should not be involved. i think the people there should solve the problems and eventually israel won't be able to depend upon t
in gaza rained down on israel this week. israelies were injured and at least one was killed. but it sure is right -- absolute right of self-defense is responded to defend its people. prime minister netanyahu said it best. the terrorists are committing a double war crime. they fire at israeli citizens and they hide behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perha
by -- met by some tough language from the security council. not from the government, israel or anyone. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that expe
. israel bombarded the gaza strip with more than 180 airstrikes today. the king of jordan has canceled a visit to britain under the protest there. "the new york times" reporting the pentagon says it could take more than 45,000 troops to contain them. i cannot remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day. so much is new, and they are all inter-connected. hamas is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
be built. i spoke earlier today with the consulate general for the state of israel in philadelphia offering my support and concern for the unfortunate circumstances that are taking place in the middle east now in which hundreds of bombs have -- rockets have been shot at israel. some of its largest cities as the targets. and this is a matter in which obviously much high levels in our government, there have been communications and the assurance that israel has the right to defend itself. but i think that we can see in this russia trade agreement that if we can get to the point where there can be relationships that are built on self-interest and economic development, that we can put the weapons aside and move towards a circumstance in which people are focused on economic activity. we see in this crisis a circumstance that we hope will resolve itself. obviously we stand with our ally, but we also hope for a day in which peace will reign and economic opportunities. i agree with david dreier, really is a way in which eventually we can create a circumstance in which people will not have the necess
, as will the head of the d triple c, chairman johns for the house races, steve israel of new york, news conference coming at 2:00 eastern. we'll likely have it for you here on c-span as the house is expected to gavel out quickly at 2:00. >> what i like about c-span's coverage is it's in-depth. oftentimes you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch the communicators, i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking. i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. the lame duck session starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. until then part of this morning's "washington journal." host: we are back with the former senator from indiana served as democrat for that state from 1999 to 2011. now co-founder of the no labels organization. senator bayh, let me begin with the petraeus resignation. what's your reaction? you served on the intelligence
think that's across the board , his relationship with israel, his relationship with the muslim world. host: this is a "financial times" editorial today. rethink on drones after petraeus exit. general petraeus has been the master mind behind using deprones to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa, etc. what has been the world reaction to these -- this type of mill tear strategy. guest: the administration has doubled down on thes you of drones. there are hundreds more than there ever were in the bush administration. there's clear security rationale for some of them. there are certainly issues. the administration's execity -- executive privilege in making these decisions. i don't think petraeus was the only person who has been the master mind. this has been -- there are many figures in the administration that feel strongly about this. i don't see the policy changing. but there is certainly a feeling in pakistan, especially, in the horn of africa and other places new york yemen, it was -- i believe it was the day of -- the day after, the morning after the evening of obama's victory, th
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10